Jamul Indian Village – June Newsletter

Young Acorns Learn about Warrior Shields and the Importance of Mental HealthAcorns to Oaks

Acorns to Oaks partnered with the Southern Indian Health Council to host an educational mental health event on Saturday, June 27th at El Monte Park. Family and friends from Jamul, Manzanita, La Posta, and Campo came together to learn about the importance of mental health, including the importance of understanding appropriate behavior and actions for children and adults. Jennifer Jenkins, Mental Health Therapist at the Southern Indian Health Council, led the conversation. Ms. Jenkins has been working at the Southern Indian Health Council for more than six years, and is a tribal member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma.

The Council had the children participate in making customary Warrior Shields as a way to teach the young Acorns about appropriate behavior. Traditionally, Native Americans created Warrior Shields not only for battle or war, but to represent their personal vision and inherent abilities. They were used for spiritual, mental, and physical protection.

The shields were thought to protect the warrior in four ways: first was in the round shape, which is thought to be sacred; second, in the way that they were made, constructed with the thickest part of the animal hide, to stop an enemy’s arrow; third, they were painted with protective image that provided guidance; and lastly, they would attach feathers and other objects that were of personal significance to give them strength.

About Acorns to Oaks

Acorns to Oaks is a community group developed by the Jamul Indian Village focused on the prevention of teen pregnancy, alcohol and drug use, and to educate their young members on their heritage and culture. This group also serves as a volunteer group and they plan to continue to work with many local organizations.

About Jennifer Jenkins

Jennifer Jenkins has been working at Southern Indian Health Council’s Kumeyaay Family Services beginning in May, 2009 through June, 2012 and returned to the clinic as a Mental Health Therapist Intern in July, 2014. She is a tribal member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and her passion is working with native children, families, and adults. As part of providing individual, group and family therapy for different populations, Jennifer is passionate about integrating art therapy as way to facilitate expression and feels it is an effective tool in understanding the self. Jennifer primarily works at Southern Indian’s Campo Clinic but also meets with client’s at the Alpine Clinic.

Crisis House Welcomes Council Members as Volunteers

Crisis House
Jamul Indian Village Council Members visited Crisis House this June to learn how they could best support their neighbors now and into the future. The Council members met with leaders of the organization to learn more about their mission and vision for the future and how JIV can support the organization through community service, partnerships, and financially once the casino opens in next year.

Chairperson Erica Pinto and Executive Council Member Chris Pinto volunteered for Crisis House this weekend at their fishing outing at Chollas Lake. They helped with the kids learning to fish and with food preparation. They enjoyed the day and plan to attend some of the upcoming events.

About Crisis House

The mission of Crisis House is to respond immediately to break the cycle of poverty, domestic violence and homelessness and strengthen families and individuals so they can thrive and transform their lives. They promote self-sufficiency through case management and life-saving food, housing and other critical services in partnership with the community, so the people they serve become safe, healthy and self-sufficient. For more information visit: crisishouse.org

Topping Out Celebration

Richard St. Jean

These are exciting times for the Jamul Indian Village of California and Penn National Gaming! In June we celebrated the “Topping Out” of the Hollywood Casino Jamul-San Diego in a private ceremony.

“Topping Out” is one of the construction industry’s oldest customs. Typically, the last beam fitted into the exterior of a building is affixed with an American flag and an evergreen tree, to symbolize new growth. We found a native black oak tree to be more fitting to the Jamul Indian Village and the region.

Erica Pinto, Chairperson of Jamul Indian Village said, “This marks another milestone in the development of our gaming facility and path to economic independence.”

To date, approximately 20,000 cubic yards of concrete has been poured, enough concrete to fill six Olympic size swimming pools to a depth of six feet. Construction workers and the local building trades unions have completed over 500,000 work hours.

At the ceremony, newly appointed General Manager Richard St. Jean thanked attendees for their diligence and hard work who made the significant moment possible, including the Jamul Indian Village, C.W. Driver, members of the San Diego Building & Construction Trades Council, subcontractors, elected officials, and many others.

Dining and Entertainment at Hollywood Casino Jamul-San Diego

The Jamul Indian Village of California and Penn National Gaming recently unveiled the dining and entertainment concepts that will be inside Hollywood Casino Jamul-San Diego.

The first concepts include, among others:

  • Final Cut Steak & Seafood – a contemporary American steakhouse serving hand-cut to order USDA Prime Beef, fresh and local seafood, and an extensive wine list;
  • A noodle bar featuring authentic Asian flavors will be served in traditional and contemporary dishes;
  • An upscale sports bar and posh lounge featuring national and regional entertainment located just steps away from the gaming action;
  • A roof-top beer garden highlighting local and international breweries with expansive views of the region; and,
  • A four-venue food court.

“These dining and entertainment offerings will provide customers a variety of top quality options in one place,” said Richard St. Jean, General Manager of Hollywood Casino Jamul-San Diego. “Importantly, it will also allow us to highlight products and entertainment from East County to promote the region to guests and drive visitation and sales to businesses throughout the area.”

JIV and Hollywood Casino Jamul-San Diego have created a Local Business Partnership Program and are reaching out to area businesses to identify products and services to sell and promote at the casino. To learn how you can become a Local Business Partner, please contact JIV: jamulindianvillage.com/contact

Hundreds of Jobs Coming to East County

The emails keep pouring in about the jobs coming to East County! We look forward to meeting all of you and providing information on how to apply when the employment process begins later this year. In the interim, we’d like to share more about the variety of positions that will be offered at Hollywood Casino Jamul-San Diego.
This month’s e-newsletter highlights the Slot Technician and Service Attendant positions. View information about all types of jobs at: jamulindianvillage.com/careers

Slot Technician

As a Slot Technician, your primary focus will be on keeping the slot machines running. We’re looking for someone who is customer service-oriented and has a strong technical aptitude. Key responsibilities include:

  • Troubleshooting and repairing all related equipment
  • Performing repairs and preventative maintenance of all slot marching, and other technical equipment
  • Monitoring equipment are in proper working order
  • Completing all regulatory and company operational logs or forms
  • Providing a positive customer experience

Slot Service Attendant

As a Slot Service Attendant, your role will include extensive guest interaction, with your primary focus on star treatment for all of our guests. Key responsibilities include:

  • Informing guests about all promotions and casino activities
  • Processing payouts
  • Investigating and resolving issues
  • Troubleshooting any issues with tickets or printer problems