Basketry

Basketry is an important part of our history. Basket making is an art handed down from family to family from a time when baskets were used as granaries for storage of food, such as acorns. There are many varieties of acorns in southern California that are gathered in the fall and made into a delicious pudding called Shawee. Grinding Stones were used to de-shell acorns. Once dried, the acorns were was ground into a powder to prepare the acorns for Shawee. Some say the taste is similar to unsweetened custard, and it is a tasty side dish to our meals. In the past, baskets were traded for money as they became more collectible to outsiders.

Singing and Dancing

Singing and dancing have long been colorful and musical components of our Kumeyaay history. Celebrations of song are a big tradition among Tribal Members, not only for life but in memory of those that have passed away and at larger gatherings, such as Powwows. With the passing of time, these honored traditions were dying within all of the Kumeyaay communities. Respected members of our Native American Community such as former Chairman Leroy Elliott, John Christman, and others brought back these traditions and continue to teach many of our young people today. Our people have risen and today celebrate this important part of our heritage, preparing to carry it on to future generations.

Basketry

Basketry is an important part of our history. Basket making is an art handed down from family to family from a time when baskets were used as granaries for storage of food, such as acorns. There are many varieties of acorns in southern California that are gathered in the fall and made into a delicious pudding called Shawee. Grinding Stones were used to de-shell acorns. Once dried, the acorns were was ground into a powder to prepare the acorns for Shawee. Some say the taste is similar to unsweetened custard, and it is a tasty side dish to our meals. In the past, baskets were traded for money as they became more collectible to outsiders.

Singing and Dancing

Singing and dancing have long been colorful and musical components of our Kumeyaay history. Celebrations of song are a big tradition among Tribal Members, not only for life but in memory of those that have passed away and at larger gatherings, such as Powwows. With the passing of time, these honored traditions were dying within all of the Kumeyaay communities. Respected members of our Native American Community such as former Chairman Leroy Elliott, John Christman, and others brought back these traditions and continue to teach many of our young people today. Our people have risen and today celebrate this important part of our heritage, preparing to carry it on to future generations.